Haiku Help

By , November 2, 2007 11:32 am

Hopefully this week’s Unplugged Project isn’t too daunting. It involves reading or writing a haiku. If you have older children, then they can try writing one, if not (and you feel brave enough) then you can try it. A very basic description of a haiku is the following:

Haiku:
– subject: everyday things – often nature, feelings, or experiences
– length: three short NON-RHYMING lines
– form:
1st line: 5 syllables
2nd line: 7 syllables
3rd line: 5 syllables

Here a few links which might help or inspire:

Haiku for People

Internet School Library Media Center Haiku Page

eHow: How to Write a Haiku (good basic advice)

I went to our local library in search of some haiku books for children and came home empty- handed (but our library is quite small). If anyone finds some good kids’ haiku books, please write about it! A search on Amazon of “haiku” in the children’s books section turns up lots of good-looking options, so I know the books are out there somewhere, just not in MY library.

Remember, these projects are supposed to be flexible and fun, so if you want to do a poem other than a haiku, that’s fine. If you just want to draw a picture that’s fine too. The point is for everyone to have fun. Plus, I am trying to make the projects adaptable to all ages, little ones through adult. Here, again, are this week’s instructions:

Haiku

1) Write a haiku and illustrate it, either via original artwork or photo

-or-

2) Read (and share) a haiku and illustrate it, either via original artwork or photo

-or-

3) For smaller children, parents can find (or write) the haiku and help their children “illustrate” it

-or-

4) Any other haiku/poetry possibilities that you can imagine! Anything is fine…just go with what you want to do!

(unless you have a newly budding photographer at home, the photo option is probably more one for any older children or adults who want to take part and would rather not illustrate)

Haiku:
– subject: everyday things – often nature, feelings, or experiences
– length: three short NON-RHYMING lines
– form:
1st line: 5 syllables
2nd line: 7 syllables
3rd line: 5 syllables

Click here for some examples.

Hope to see you on Monday!

Image from Wikimedia Commons: Calligraphy by Ishizaki Keisui

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7 Responses to “Haiku Help”

  1. Andamom says:

    First, I have told a number of people that I know about your weekly activity! I’m really looking forward to seeing what’s next!

    My daughter said that Haiku’s are the one type of poetry that she isn’t good at… So, I’ll try it by myself… She does love writing songs though… so can you do a write a song one week?

  2. Jenny says:

    I didn’t have much luck at the library either- I found a single book that I thought looked good. I haven’t quit decided how we’re going to do this, but it feels good to use my creative juices a little!

  3. Andrée says:

    I really enjoyed this activity. I need to access my artistic side more and I need to struggle with it. I know it’s not good haiku but it’s mine and I’m proud. I can see where haiku would be great accompaniment to photography. I may try more and more of it. This is what happens when you try something new: new doors open that you never knew existed.

    What’s next?

  4. Cloudscome says:

    I love this project! I have a lot of haiku at my blog. I’m at home now but will come back later when I am at my library and give you some book ideas. There are some really great ones out this year written with kids in mind.

  5. Mom Unplugged says:

    Hi Cloudscome,
    I would LOVE it if you could give me some kids’ haiku book ideas. I look forward to seeing what you cme up with! Thanks!

  6. ACM says:

    If you ever want some future guidance for deeper exploration of haiku, I have an essay from almost a decade ago (!) online here which might be of some use. It’s a great genre, and I’m always happy to find opportunity to fight back against syllable-counting as an approximation for what it can be . . .

  7. Mom Unplugged says:

    Hi ACM,
    Thanks so much for the link to your essay. It is really helpful and certainly illustrates that, as you say, haiku is much deeper than mere syllable-counting. If I get into more online haiku projects, I’ll definitely link to this. Thanks again!

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