Category: arts and crafts

Top Secret Turkey Placemat

By , November 22, 2016 5:59 pm

img_2668

We all know about “Secret Santa,” but how about “Top Secret Turkey?”

With Thanksgiving in the United States a mere three days away (what happened to the year, can someone tell me please??), we wanted to come up with a fun idea to celebrate being thankful. The children were talking about their fond memories of weaving construction paper placemats each year at their Montessori school to use at the school Thanksgiving feast, so we came up with a variation of the simple woven placemat that also incorporates thankfulness.

This is pretty easy and works for all ages.  Totally doable with younger children (if they can’t cut well yet, you can precut the strips) or with teenagers if they’ll agree to it.  Mine did because they wanted to make the placemat of their memories and honestly, we had a lot of silly fun along the way.

The basics you will need are construction paper, scissors, and something to write with.  We used colored Sharpies.

1) Choose your paper colors. We used red, yellow, orange, and brown to represent fall.  Orient the sheets of paper vertically and use a ruler to mark off one inch increments.

dsc_00922) Using the guide dots, cut the papers into one inch strips.  They don’t have to be perfect.  I actually think it looks better if they aren’t.

dsc_0095

3) Arrange the strips in rows in a pattern if you like patterns (I am a pattern kind of person) or random if that suits you better!  Experiment with the number of strips you will need of each color to achieve the size that you want.  We used four strips each of our four colors (so we had some left over).

4) Tape the very top of the papers to the table using a long strip of tape to hold them in place (LESSON LEARNED: We used Scotch Tape and it was quite difficult to remove from the table afterwards, masking tape would be much easier).

5) Now you can begin weaving.  Very little ones will need help with this.  Follow the same pattern you used with the vertical strips or make a new one.

dsc_0111

dsc_0118

6) Now get a glue stick or some white glue and glue underneath each top flap at the edge all the way around the mat.

dsc_0126

Unstick the tape from the table and flip the mat over.  Fold over the taped flap to easily stick down that edge.   Then repeat same gluing process as first side along the remaining edges of the mat.

7) Cut off the extra bits that are hanging off.

dsc_0138

 

 

Now for the Top Secret part!  

Put all the placemats in a pile. Before your meal, have everyone at the Thanksgiving table draw a name out of a hat to determine who’s Top Secret Turkey they will be.  Next have each person take a random placemat and write on the back of the placemat something they are thankful for about the person who’s name they drew.  On the front of the placemat, they should write that person’s name.  If you are concerned with handwriting being a giveaway, prepare stickers with all the names ahead of time (either computer printed or all written by the same person).  Set the table with the placemats. An added bonus is that the names will serve as place markers so everyone knows where to sit.

At some point before, during or after the meal, have everyone turn over their mat and read the nice comment. Each person can then try to guess who is his or her Top Secret Turkey!  It’s a fun game that leaves everyone feeling happy and appreciated!

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Here are two other thankful-related projects that you might enjoy:

(NOTE: I apologize for the lack of photos in these posts.  They suffered from my great photo disaster but I am working on finding and replacing them, or recreating them!)

 

Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

Classic Fall Trees

By , October 10, 2013 1:45 pm

This is not high tech.  It is not original and unique.  It requires only paint, paper, water, a sponge, and a brush.  But sometimes classic and easy is what makes a long-lasting impression.  My beloved early elementary art teacher did this fall project with us and I STILL remember it.  Of all the art projects from the 9 years that I had art classes in school, this one stands out and I was probably only 5 or 6 when I did it. Here it is:

Sponge painting fall trees!

Sounds kind of “ho hum” to those of us striving for complicated and original art forms, but I can guarantee that the results are usually amazing, even with really little ones.  Watch your children’s faces as they work.  There is something magical that happens when they realize they can paint beautifully with something other than a brush!

Supplies

  • Orange, red, yellow, and brown paint (I recommend a washable tempera)
  • White paper (ordinary copy paper is fine)
  • A wide brush and a small sponge (sea sponge is best, but any sponge is OK)
  • A bowl of water for rinsing the sponge between colors

Let each child draw a tree trunk on the paper with the wide brush and brown paint, beginning at the bottom and extending half-way up.  Then let them have at it with the sponge and the colors.

Be sure to teach them to lightly dip the sponge in the paint (really a tiny amount works much better) and to dab the sponge gently on and off the page.  Some will want to smear it like a paint brush.  Some will still smear it on the page like a paint brush despite the instructions, the results will still be satisfying and fine, but not as realistic.

Also, be sure to explain that before changing colors they should dip the sponge in the water to wash it off.  Demonstrate squeezing the sponge over and over to get the old paint out.  Also demonstrate how to squeeze it really hard over the bowl afterwards until it doesn’t drip anymore.  This is quite important, because some young children will be more fascinated with the whole sponge and water process and will wind up with a very wet artwork.

If you try this with a large group of young children, be prepared for a lengthy clean up in the art room, and the bathroom where they will wash their inevitably, very much paint-covered hands.

Also be prepared for huge interest (even from reluctant artists) and lots of smiles and pride in their accomplishment!

 

 

Watercolor and Rice Art

By , September 23, 2013 9:28 am

I LOVE WATERCOLOR PAINT!  I like being able to just pull out the cute little box and the teeny, tiny brush, grab a cup of water, a piece of paper, and voilà!  Ready to go!  Plus with watercolor, I don’t live in fear of the post-art session cleanup.

If you are bored with just having your child slap some watercolor paint on a piece of paper, check out some of the creative watercolor ideas out there, such as these from The Artful Parent, or those featured in a top ten list at KidsArt.

I decided to jazz up a recent 3 to 6 year-old art class watercolor session by trying this interesting idea from the Fairy Dust Teaching Blog that I can sum up in one word:  Rice.

The idea is to paint lots of water color on the page, sprinkle on dry rice, and let it sit while everything dries.  The rice should absorb some of the paint and produce a lovely, ethereal bubbly/frost-like effect.

I told the kids to paint whatever they wanted.  They could do one color across the whole page, a pattern, a picture or multiple random colors.  The trick, I said,  was to cover the whole page with color (this was a bit too much to ask of a few of the 3 year-olds, but that’s OK).

As they finished, I brought out the secret rice ingredient.  The kids loved sprinkling on the rice!  A few were so into it that they made big piles.

I was worried that since the children were taking so long to paint, the paper and paint might be drying out.  I resolved this by squirting each page with some water before the final step of rice application.

The results were mixed for us.  Each child produced a lovely watercolor painting to take home.  Only a few of those works really showed that rice had been present, and the effect was of rice outlines, very pretty and cool, but not what I had hoped for.

What I learned:

  • Sally of Fairy Dust Teaching used watercolor paper for her lovely effect.  I used what I had on hand, plain old copy paper (a risky move on my part!).
  • I think that the paint needs to be very richly applied and be very wet, not a technique that is natural for most little ones with watercolor.  However, this is probably much easier to achieve with watercolor paper that is more far more absorbent than what I used.
  • The effect can be cool on plain old copy paper too, but it was only obvious in the work of those children who really used a lot of paint.

My favorite painting is the one at the top of the post.  Personally, I think the copy paper effect looks a bit like a microscopic image of bacteria.  I see a science tie-in here somehow!

Sunday Recycling Fun

By , October 30, 2011 4:20 pm

Just had to post these boats.  They turned the bathtub into an ocean (think shells, rocks, plastic fish) and created boats out of saved trash:

Mt favorite thing has to be the Jolly Roger that my 5 year-old drew all by herself for her boat!

Fireworks in a Dish

By , March 6, 2011 4:35 pm

fireworks

 

If you have milk, food coloring and dish washing soap on hand…

you can have impressive rainy-day science fun!

Pour some milk into a plate:

Wait a minute for any motion in the milk to settle down, then add four drops of different colors of food coloring.  Place the drops next to each other near the center of the plate.

 

Wait a minute or so until the colors get a bit blotchy-looking:

 

Take a clean cotton swab and gently place it on the colors.  What do you think will happen?

(SPOILER ALERT:  Absolutely nothing.)

Now put a drop of dish soap onto the other, clean and dry end of your swab.

What will happen when you put the soapy swab gently onto the colors?  Look!

It even continues impressively swirling and churning after you have lifted the swab out of the milk!

Try putting your swab in different areas of the plate to see what new patterns form.

NOTE:  It is very important not to stir, just hold your swab still in the milk.

Make sure you have plenty of milk and food coloring on hand for this because your kids won’t want to do it just one time.  This kept my 5 year-old entertained for at least an hour!

Many thanks to Steve Spangler’s Science Experiments for this really fun idea! Steve Spangler has a good explanation of the science behind this colorful display. You can read it here.

___________________________________________________

This is my contribution to this month’s Unplugged Project theme of soap.  Can you come up with a soap-themed project?  If so, please join in and add a link or comment to the original project post.  You can read more about the Unplugged Project here!

Blog Widget by LinkWithin

Panorama Theme by Themocracy