Posts tagged: sea monkeys

The Birds Do It, The Bees Do It, Even The Itty Bitty Sea Monkeys Do It…

By , September 24, 2007 11:37 am

CAUTION: YOU MUST BE OVER THE AGE OF 21 TO READ THIS POST.

The other day my 7 year-old daughter went to feed the sea monkeys and yelled to me: “Hey Mom! Come here, I have to show you something really interesting!” As I approached my daughter whose eyes were riveted on the sea monkey tank, she said, “Look Mom, they’re stuck together! Why are they stuck together?”

I look, and sure enough, two sea monkeys were “stuck together.” (Please refer to the *x*-r@ted sea monkey photo – sorry it is a bit blurry but it is not easy photographing mating sea monkeys, especially with a mediocre digital camera).

I attempt to mutter some lie about how I am really not sure why they are stuck together when my daughter spots some nearly microscopic babies swimming near the bottom of the tank, which successfully divert her attention from the attached sea monkeys.

OK. We clearly have sea monkey hanky panky going on here. Wild sea monkey o*gies* are taking place in my home but I am simply not ready to be explaining to my 7 year-old why the sea monkeys are “stuck together.” Honestly, the fact that sea monkeys ever even would be “stuck together” is news to me. That shows how much I know!

But, having no life and being of a nerdy mentality I had to know more. After the kids had gone to bed and I was free to research naughty sea monkey behaviors without fear of being discovered, I started to check it all out online. Here are the Sea Monkey Facts of Life as I interpret them from what I have spent way too much time researching:

- Sea monkeys are either male or female, not hermaphrodite like worms for example.

- If no willing mate is available, then a female can reproduce without fertilization of her eggs, called parthenogenesis, “self-conception” (my Sea Monkey females seem to have plenty of willing males to help them out however).

- Males have a long traily tail and females of breeding age have a visible egg sack (I just thought they were constipated…oops).

- Males sometimes compete with each other to be favored by an eligible female (Wow! Just like human males!)

- The mating thing takes a long time (I can tell you that from my own observations) – sometimes several weeks according to this site!

- If the conditions are not really right for the hatching of the eggs (water temperature too cold for example), the eggs can live on indefinitely without hatching. They will hatch when the optimum conditions occur.

- The eggs can actually sometimes hatch inside the female in which case the female gives birth to the babies at the bottom of the tank. (Can she have an epidural?)

Want more sea monkey dirt? Then check out these informative sites:

Sea Monkey Geek
Sea Monkey Worship Page
Sea Monkey Mania
Official Sea Monkey Website
– (“Sea Monkey Reproduction” at The Official Sea Monkey Website)

Happy Birthday Sea Monkeys!

By , July 15, 2007 8:58 am

I am sure you have all been dying to know how our Sea Monkeys are doing. Well, they are just fine thank you! At left is a bad picture of their tank. The little beige things swimming around are the Sea Monkeys who are now about 1/4″ long from head to tail. They are just a little over one month-old! HAPPY BIRTHDAY LITTLE GUYS!!!

I am supposed to be packing for our big trip tomorrow but I hate packing and have found the ultimate form of procrastination: attempting to photograph a 1/4″ long, rapidly swimming Sea Monkey using only a mediocre digital camera.

After about 25 attempts, I finally got it just right and snapped a Sea Monkey portrait to be proud of!

Here it is:

Isn’t he cute? His name is Squiggles 7, or maybe Squiggles 23, I am not sure since they all have a very strong family resemblance.

To read about the process of hatching Sea Monkeys, see my June 18th, Perfect Pet post, or click on the label “sea monkeys” in the right sidebar.

Now, back to my packing. Big sigh. I will be away for about three weeks and will have computer access, although my posts might be a bit less frequent.

I advise everyone to stay off Southwest Airlines on Monday, as you risk meeting my screeching 18 month-old in person. I plan on passing out ear plugs.

The Perfect Pet (?)

By , June 18, 2007 8:09 am

On International Sea Monkey Day (May 16th – mark your calender for next year) I revealed my secret fascination with the sea monkey concept. So, during one of my as-infrequent-as-possible trips to Walmart, how could I pass up the $6.00 Sea Monkey kit that I happened to see!

Despite my warnings that the “Sea Monkeys” (aka. brine shrimp) would definitely not be as cute and cuddly as the picture on the package, my kids were thrilled with this experiment.

It was really quite simple. First we had to fill the tank with tap water. Then we put in the powdery contents of packet Number 1, a water purifier, and let it sit 24 hours.

The next evening was the fun time. After insuring that the water was the recommended temperature, my daughter poured in Packet #2, the eggs! My son stirred, and voila!

The results? Well, not much that we could see. Perhaps our water was a little colder than recommended (means a longer hatching period).

By the next morning however, three almost microscopic little squiggles were visible (sort of). The children christened them Squiggles, Squirmy, and Wiggles. By that evening we had such a colony that naming them was impossible (how about Squiggles 1, Squiggles 2, Squiggles 3… Squiggles 142, etc.). Such excitement! You’d think we were hatching chickens or elephants or something.

On day 5 we gave them a bit of food from Packet #3. They seem pretty happy. I guess I don’t see why brine shrimp can’t be happy.

We have had them a week now and I must say they are growing rapidly. You can now make them out easily, and if you look closely, you can even see their little waving legs (arms? fins? cilia?). Still too small for a photo though, so I will post this dramatic closeup from Wikipedia:

Try this project with your kids. I would say that we have definitely had our $6.00 worth of fun already!

Plus, maybe they are not so cute, maybe they are not so cuddly but – they don’t yack up furballs on your new sisal rug, need a walk in the middle of the night or shed fur all over your favorite little black dress.

Today is International Sea Monkey Day!

By , May 16, 2007 10:01 pm

How could I nearly have missed this important holiday! I just discovered that today, May 16th, is International Sea Monkey Day! (I kid you not.) Children the world over will dress their Sea Monkeys up in their Sunday-best, sing Sea Monkey songs, eat Sea Monkey-shaped cakes. What would a Sea-Monkey shaped cake look like any way?

Like many children of my era, I fell victim to the advertisements in the comic pages of the Sunday paper and desperately wanted some Sea Monkeys (Artemia Salina, brine shrimp). My mother knew they were not what they appeared to be in the ads featuring cute little smiling humanoids and, certainly fearing having to deal with my disappointment, would not let me have any. [Note: Ad picture was found on Sea Monkey Geek at his post Were you Disappointed?]

I am glad to see that Sea Monkeys still exist, and actually seem to be quite a popular subject on the internet:

  • Click here for a Sea Monkey musical video entitled “Ocean Of Fire.”
  • To order (or for more info about these “dream pets”) visit the Official Sea-Monkey Website.
  • Visit Sea Monkey Mania or Sea Monkey Geek.
  • If you are REALLY into your Sea Monkeys, then visit the Sea Monkey Worship Page.
  • Search “sea monkeys” on Amazon and you will find three whole pages of Sea Monkeys items! How about Sea Monkeys on Mars, or even a Sea Monkey action figure to celebrate this special day?

Happy International Sea Monkey Day!!

PS: Sea Monkeys seem to be quite a cultural phenomenon for a certain generation. If you are too old or too young, you may not have even heard of them. I was just on the cusp of the end of Sea Monkey popularity. If you have Sea Monkey memories to share, please leave a comment!

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