Posts tagged: potholder loom

Removing a Potholder From a Loom

By , January 1, 2008 6:59 pm

potholder3
This is a public service post for all the people who find me by Googling something like: “taking potholder off loom” and for the one or two people who have left comments asking me how to take it off. It is really quite easy:

You will need the hook that came with the loom or a crochet hook.

potholder

Start at a corner and pull the second loop in the row, through the first loop. Then you pull the third loop through the second, the fourth through the third, etc. etc. all the way around the pot holder. It will be kind of a linked chain around the edge like in the photo.

potholder2

You will eventually end up with only one final loop. That is the loop that you can use to hang the potholder on a hook.

If you have any other questions about it, feel free to comment or email me (my email is in the right sidebar).

Hope this helps!

Sturdy Metal Pot Holder Loom

By , November 23, 2007 6:54 pm

For my sister’s recent birthday, my oldest daughter worked very hard to make Auntie the gift of a potholder for her tea kettle.

Do you remember those potholder looms with the cotton loops? I do! I used to love making potholders. My poor mother was overrun with potholders. Well, apparently potholder-love does not skip a generation since my 7 year-old seems to be as fascinated with her loom as I was with mine.

Unfortunately for my mother, I didn’t realize as a child that there are other things that can be made with these little woven squares besides potholders! The instructions to our loom suggest sewing them together to make a placemat or doll rug, a treasure box or tissue holder, even a purse or a doll sleeping bag. The possibilities are endless.

You might be able to find these little kits at hobby stores, but since we have no hobby stores here, I found ours on Amazon. It is a good one since the frame is made of sturdy metal rather than plastic (ours is by Harrisville Designs). It came with a long metal hook, a crochet hook, enough colorful 100% cotton loops to make several potholders (you can buy wool loops too), and complete instructions. I’ll be sure to provide links to several different kits at the bottom of my post.

Those of you who are more ambitious and “crafty” than I, might be interested to learn that these little looms can apparently also be used with yarn. You can weave yarn squares for afghans, vests, or other projects. See this link for more information on how to do this.

Wondering how to remove it from the loom? Read my post: Removing a Potholder From a Loom.

Potholders "Loom" in Your Future

By , September 21, 2007 10:54 am

NOTE: If you are looking for instructions for removing a potholder from the loom, see my post: How to Remove a Potholder From a Loom.
_____________

(Sorry for the bad joke in the title, but I simply couldn’t resist.)

Crafts make a great alternative to TV. TV-free kids have time for lots and lots of arts and crafts!Yesterday was my sister’s birthday (Happy Birthday!!) and my oldest daughter worked very hard to make Auntie the gift of a potholder for her tea kettle.

Do you remember those potholder looms with the cotton loops? I do! I used to love making potholders. My poor mother was overrun with potholders. Well, apparently potholder-love does not skip a generation since my 7 year-old seems to be as fascinated with her loom as I was with mine.

Unfortunately for my mother, I didn’t realize as a child that there are other things that can be made with these little woven squares besides potholders! The instructions to our loom suggest sewing them together to make a placemat or doll rug, a treasure box or tissue holder, even a purse or a doll sleeping bag. The possibilities are endless.

You might be able to find these little kits at hobby stores, but since we have no hobby stores here, I found ours on Amazon. It is a good one since the frame is made of sturdy metal rather than plastic (ours is by Harrisville Designs). It came with a long metal hook, a crochet hook, enough colorful 100% cotton loops to make several potholders (you can buy wool loops too), and complete instructions. I’ll be sure to provide links to several different kits at the bottom of my post.

Those of you who are more ambitious and “crafty” than I, might be interested to learn that these little looms can apparently also be used with yarn. You can weave yarn squares for afghans, vests, or other projects. See this link for more information on how to do this.

Here are a few photos:

 

The completed potholder still on the loom.

 

Removal from the loom – a delicate process!

The finished potholder with loop for hanging!

 

Blog Widget by LinkWithin

Panorama Theme by Themocracy