Posts tagged: international cuisine

Kids Cook Idea – Moroccan Mint Tea

By , June 30, 2007 9:43 am

When I think of the word sweet I first think of my children. But since they are only sweet some of the time, my next thought is of something that is always sweet: Moroccan Mint Tea.

If you have never had it, I can tell you that it is very minty and so sweet as to be almost syrupy. Yum! It is fun to make with kids, especially if they grow the mint themselves (my 5 year-old son grew this), or at least harvest it from the garden themselves.

It is traditionally served in a pretty, colorfully painted glass and is always offered to guests as a symbol of welcome.

Here is my rather more eclectic version made in a Japanese cast iron teapot with mint from my Arizona garden and served in a Swedish Ikea glass. But the tea still tasted very good, and very sweet!

Recipe (I can’t vouch for its authenticity, but it tastes pretty much like I remember it):

2 tsp. green tea leaves

1 bunch spearmint leaves
4 – 6 tsp sugar (I use 6)

Place tea leaves in pot. Warm teapot by quickly rinsing tea with some boiling water then drain off water right away (use strainer to catch tea and return to pot if no strainer in pot). Add mint leaves to the tea in pot. Pour in enough boiling water for two small glasses. Add sugar to taste. It should be very sweet. Pour into glass, return to pot and repeat a couple of times. Drink hot.

The mint in the garden:

 

The ingredients:

No, The World Does Not Eat Mac & Cheese

By , March 27, 2007 10:04 am

While we are on the subject of picky eaters, I want to feature a cool book that teaches kids that the world does not revolve around mac & cheese. I have already written a post about this book, but since it is SUCH a great book, I thought I ought to write about it again.

The book is called Let’s Eat: What Children Eat Around the World (author Beatrice Hollyer). Each chapter features a child from one of five countries: India, France, South Africa, Mexico and Thailand. Through text and numerous colorful photos, we see a bit of their daily lives and the food involved, as well as a festival or a special day involving food.

At the end there are also five easy recipes, one from each child: Condensed Milk Tart (South Africa), Tomato Salsa (Mexico), Thai Fried Eggs, French Chocolate Cake, and Coconut Sweet (India). None of these is shockingly exotic, but some might introduce a bit of a new taste to American palates. Reading a chapter of this book and then cooking the corresponding recipe could be a fun “Kids Cook Night” activity.

An added bonus: all royalties go to Oxfam, so by buying the book, you are actually helping children and families around the world too!

PS: “Great Diaper Challenge” update: Sorry we have not started yet. The baby is suffering from some sort of gastrointestinal bug so I thought it best to wait until her digestive tract and her mood have returned to normal before we try out the new gDiapers!

Let’s Eat! What Children Eat Around the World (Beatrice Hollyer)

By , February 27, 2007 8:52 pm

Let’s Eat: What Children Eat Around the World might not transform your picky eater into a lover of exotic food, but it sure will interest him and open his eyes to the fact that kids around the world eat different things. I think that the best lesson is that although kids from different countries eat different things, they are really all the same, having fun with their families and eating their favorite foods.

Packed with photos, this book provides a fascinating glimpse into the daily lives of five boys and girls from around the world (India, France, South Africa, Mexico and Thailand). We follow them through their day, and their meals. We also attend an important celebration or activity involving food.

The book also includes one favorite recipe from each child: Condensed Milk Tart (South Africa), Tomato Salsa (Mexico), Thai Fried Eggs, French Chocolate Cake, and Coconut Sweet (India).

I find this book as enthralling as my children do. Hopefully you will too. An added bonus: all royalties go to Oxfam, so by buying the book, you are actually helping children and families around the world too!

(You might also be interested in my post about this other wonderful Beatrice Hollyer book.)

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